Real Time Podcast Recording

I was wondering if i could get some advice please. I was advise to post on here by Andrea

I have started doing a podcast / radio show and I use the following kit to record the show in real time.

Macbook Pro (2014)
Adobe Audition ( For recording)
Ableton Live 10 ( For post production)
NI Traktor Pro 3
DBX 286s & 266xs
Behringer Xenyx 1204 USB Mixing desk
Behringer B1 Condensor Mic
Behringer DT770 Pro cans
Laptop for a Jingle Cart
Focusrite 2i2 Soundcard

Im just looking for some basic advice, Should I compress as i record or in post production?
My DBX 286s is set up as per Mikes you tube video and it sounds ok to my ears but you can never tell until someone else hears it ( not that i speak much).

I was wondering if a video can be done with basic tips and advice or if one be done for people recording in real time for the 1st time. Not everybody voicetracks and this kind of recording never seems to be mentioned a whole lot.

Thanks

JB

I can tell you I have the dbx286s compressor on lightly when I do my live radio show but off when I record my podcast.

It all depends on what you’re doing. If you’re broadcasting live you have no opportunity for post processing so will have to set up the dbx286s for processing real time but if you’re not live I’d dial down the compression on the dbx286s as you can always add further compression in post but you can’t take away compression if you’ve over compressed at source.

One other thing to bare in mind is that there is no blueprint for setting your dbx286s. Mike’s settings work for Mike’s voice through Mike’s mic in Mike’s environment. My settings are probably very different but they are what works for me with my equipment in my environment. Mike’s video is a great starting point but don’t be afraid to favourite that video, learn the options and play with the settings to find the optimum settings for you knowing that you have the video favourited to go back to if you find you’ve made it sound worse.

Once you’ve found your settings it’s very much set and forget until / unless your recording space or equipment change so it’s worth taking the time to find your optimum settings.

Great advice Mark

Thanks.